4.08.2013

spring composition

Compose.
Compose beds
of much-scribbled,
eraser-rubbed
lined notebook paper
mixed with soil
in your spring garden,
food for bulbs.
Compost
your failed compositions
rather than ripping
balling
pitching them
in the recycling bin.
Let your discarded words,
disheveled
like soiled linens,
mulch your beds
and witness their blooming.
Compose.

The first two lines of this poem are the first line of "Sacred Emily" by Getrude Stein. This is poem eight of 30 for National Poetry Month!

16 comments:

  1. Yes! Love it, need it too. This is a great poem!

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  2. Oh, I love this :) What a wonderful idea. I have enough discarded words to flower this whole city.

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  3. Such a clever unravelling of the idea of composing, to composting, it is all good for the soil, good for the soul.

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  4. This should be the next stop for those poems that turn out to be real garbage.

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  5. Oh, this is droll. And I love Timo's comment!

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  6. We used to liken it to words falling off the cliff to be reorganized later.
    But mulching into compost will do too. Maybe the letters to be later reconstructed.
    I like it . . .

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  7. beautifully expressed... may we all continue to cultivate the poetic gardens of our souls!

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  8. I shall. I SHALL. Because you know I have a compost bin and lots of off compositions to add to it. ;-)

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  9. wow,thats a first of its kind..sure sounds well.

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  10. Are you sure about this?
    What colour will the flowers be when fed on our words?
    Nie thought.

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  11. Right up my green alley, marian. You can't compose without you decompose a little first, I say.

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  12. Really enjoyed this, Marian... great metaphor!

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  13. I love this, Marian. Composting the soil with our compositions to find our words spreading like wildflowers.
    K

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  14. The compose/compost/compose is played with skill and wit--but the cleverness is not cloying or overwhelming. The observations are clean and keen; this is good stuff.

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  15. spring spring spring spring!

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